Things to See and Do

Stop in at the Market on the way to the beach, take the kids go carting then catch some live country music. If you still have time, tour the light house in Point Clark, stop on the Ice Cream Trail and visit the Bruce Botanical Food Gardens. Huron-Kinloss is not just a stop, it's a destination!

Please remember to check in before you head to any business or location to see what kind of COVID-19 precautions they're taking, if the event is cancelled, or if the location you're planning to visit is open.

Beaches, Parks and Trails

Huron-Kinloss beaches stretch along Lake Huron's shoreline and include historic Boiler Beach and the Point Clark Beach located beside the landmark Point Clark Lighthouse.

Get outside and explore the many parks, playgrounds and trails in Huron-Kinloss. Our beautiful parks meet a wide range of recreational needs and promote healthy and active living for people of all ages. Start your outdoor adventure today!

Bruce Botanical Food Gardens

The Bruce Botanical Food Gardens displays a diverse collection of sustainable, organic food plants of the rare, endangered and heirloom varieties. This not-for-profit organization started in 2012 and is run by volunteers who help with everything from planting to harvesting to offering their expertise to building projects.

As a public learning centre and food-based tourist attraction, the BBFG offers a variety of educational programming and events for all ages based on issues surrounding food security and sustainable food production. The unique varieties of food harvested from the garden provide people with fresh, healthy, organic food options.

Come enjoy our rustic surroundings, reconnect with food and its sometimes crazy history. Some of our plants date back to 4000BC!

Ice Cream Trail

Usually at this time of year, we announce the opening of our Huron-Kinloss Ice Cream Trail™. As we all know, this year isn't like the rest. We're heartbroken to announce that we are postponing the 2020 Huron-Kinloss Ice Cream Trail season.

We are continuing to explore possibilities for some other activities that will respect the COVID-19 regulations set out by our medical professionals and there's still hope for a shortened tourism season. Make sure you're following us on Facebook and Instagram for updates.

Historical Walking Tour

The Ripley and Lucknow Historical Walking Tours invite you to learn more about what our communities were like in the late 1800's and early 1900's. There are many ways to participate in the walking tours: pick up a brochure at the Municipal Office in Ripley then sign out a headset or download the audio files below, or visit the maps (links below) and explore the tours at your own pace (wi-fi or data required). 

Electronic Lucknow Historical Walking Tour Maps

 Sommerville Walk

 The Sommerville Walk explores what Downtown Lucknow looked like in the late 1800's and early 1900's. Explore where the hospital was located, the old fruit market and when the original arena was built. 

Sommerville Walk Audio

 Treleaven Walk

 The Treleaven Walk begins at the Lucknow & District Sports Complex and continues to explore Downtown Lucknow.

Discover where the 8 hotels were once located in Lucknow and how Downtown Lucknow still looks very similar to mid-late 1900's. 

Treleaven Walk Audio 

Electronic Ripley Historical Walking Tour Maps 

 MacDonald Walk

 The MacDonald Walk begins on MacDonald St. and includes the Lewis Trail, Park St. and a few other key points in Ripley.

Discover where the first Blacksmith set up shop, find the Queen's Hotel and where the old Ripley jail was located. 

MacDonald Walk Audio

 MacLennan Walk

 The MacLennan Walk begins on Huron St. at the Ripley-Huron Community Centre and travels through Downtown Ripley. 

On this walk, you will find where the first Ripley fall fair was held, where the train station was, and who changed the name of Ripley to Dingwall in 1874.

MacLennan Walk Audio

 Ross Walk

 The Ross continues to explore Downtown Ripley and Jessie St. 

Travelling through most of Downtown Ripley on this walk you will uncover what stores were located here in the late 1800's and early 1900's, and when the Huron & Kinloss Telephone Company first opened their doors. 

Ross Walk Audio

Holiday Shopping Pass

Between November 12th and December 24th, make a purchase at a participating business in Lucknow or Ripley and the amount will be recorded on a Holiday Shopping Pass in $10 increments. Spend $150 and receive a chance to win on of three $150 Huron-Kinloss Shopping Sprees! 

Music In the Fields

For 12 years, Lucknow`s Music in the Fields has brought world-class talent to community including artists and bands such as Blake Shelton, Billy Currington, Big & Rich, Jake Owen James Barker and many more.

This 3-day event is held on Graceland Festival Grounds, 557 Walter St., Lucknow, ON.

Point Clark Lighthouse

The Point Clark Lighthouse is located at 529 Lighthouse Road, Point Clark and was built in the late 1850s to warn ships about the point that protrudes into Lake Huron and of the dangerous sandbars near the shoreline.

This National Historic Site was one of the first ‘imperial towers' to flash its light. Six of these towers were built by John Brown on Lake Huron and Georgian Bay in the 1850s. Built of limestone from nearby Inverhuron, the Point Clark Lighthouse stands 26.5 metres (80 feet) high, featuring 114 steps to get to the top. The stone tower is topped by a 12-sided lantern framed in cast iron, with a domed roof. A bronze lion head at each angle of the eaves directs rainwater away from the tower.

The lighthouse was acquired by Parks Canada in 1967 to commemorate the vital role of lighthouses in navigation on the Great Lakes. The lightkeeper's dwelling, built at the same time as the Lighthouse, is now operated as a museum by the Township of Huron-Kinloss.

For more information about the Point Clark Lighthouse email info@huronkinloss.com or call 519-3953735. Bruce Coast Lighthouses has details about all Lighthouses along the shoreline of Lake Huron.

Due to COVID-19, the Point Clark Lighthouse and Museum is currently closed for public tours. Please ensure you're following our Facebook for updates regarding the 2020 tourism season. You can also subscribe to get up-to-date information right in your e-mail inbox!